Why Advocates Need an Accurate Census

The 2020 Census has emerged as a hot topic in the news due to the controversial last minute addition of the citizenship question to the Census form and the lawsuits that are seeking to remove the citizenship question. The inclusion of the citizenship question will undoubtedly result in a less complete Census. A result of this fear has been that communities across the country are organizing earlier than ever before to ensure a complete and accurate census.While outreach and education are important to ensure full participation, communities will not realize the full benefit of the 2020 Census if the data collected is not tabulated and released at the level of detail needed. 

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Raima Roy
Pacific Islanders are Hard to Count… and Other Census Myths

by Tavae Samuelu & Natasha Saelua, EPIC

There have been three censuses in my lifetime, and I’ve never been counted. Not in 1990, when I was just two years old and among the nearly two million children who went uncounted that year. Not in 2000, as the daughter of then undocumented immigrants in a mixed-status family. And not in 2010, as a college student where campuses in California showed some of the lowest response rates. I have never been easy to count.* Three decades later, and I’m still “hard to count” person in the hardest to count county in the hardest to count state. It’s only now as part of Empowering Pacific Islander Communities (EPIC) that I understand the depth of that indelible label.

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Raima Roy
Exploring the Race and Ethnicity Question

The census form is primarily a straight forward survey that asks people basic questions about themselves and their household, such as age. However, when it comes to the race and ethnicity questions, understanding and answering these questions can become slightly more complicated. Through our webinarwith Dan Ichinose, Director of the Demographic Research Project at Asian Americans Advancing Justice — Los Angeles, we provide some clarity and context for these questions by exploring the history of the Race question. We demonstrate how it has evolved over the decades, what changes to these questions were suggested to achieve more accurate data collection, and how these questions will be asked on the 2020 Census form.

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Raima Roy
How to Message the 2020 Census to Our Communities

When engaging in Get Out the Count activities within AANHPI communities, it’s important to know your audience and gauge their awareness and outlook of the 2020 Census. With the assistance of Lake Research Partners, Asian Americans Advancing Justice | AAJC conducted research on AANHPI communities in Mandarin, Urdu, Hindi, Korean, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Hmong, Tagalog, and English to assess which subgroups could use more education on the census, which were the preferred methods of filling out the survey for the different groups, and what messages motivated communities to fill out the census

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Raima Roy
How Are People Counted in the Census?

Who exactly is counted in the census? According to the U.S. Constitution, all persons living in the United States regardless of their legal status must be counted. With regard to where people are counted, it depends on a person’s living situation. The rule of thumb is that a person is counted in their “usual place of residence” or where they live and sleep most of the time. But what about people who do not have a usual place of residence, such as college students or those who are homeless?

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Raima Roy
Just the Facts: An FAQ About Census

With the census approaching in 2020, it’s more important than ever to have all the right facts about the Census 2020 survey and enumeration process. Knowing why the census is important, when key milestones will occur, the different methods by which to fill it out, and what language support is provided are essential in ensuring that Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders are not left out of the 2020 census.

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Raima RoyCensus, FAQs, Tiimeline